Mr. Hennessey & Mr. Hoge's AP World History

AP World History Themes:

Statebuilidng expansion and conflict.

 

Interaction between humans and the environment.

 

 

Creation, expansion and interaction of economic systems.

 

Development and interaction of cultures.

Development and transformation of social structures.

Essential Skills

Analyzing Historical Sources and Evidence

Making Historical
Connections
Chronological
Reasoning
Creating and
Supporting an
Argument

Analyzing
Evidence: Content
and Sourcing

Interpretation Comparison Contextualization Synthesis Causation Continuity
and Change Over Time
Periodization Argumentation Argumentation: Using
Evidence to Support
an Argument
  Announcements:

 

 

Model UN interest meeting Aug 31st at 3:30 in H69

 

Hoge's Class Code

5th Period AP World

 

Remind: @hoge5thp to 81010

Google Classroom: 6twbzb

AP Insight: HAYW339 at https://cb.academicmerit.com/register

 

Hennessey's Class Codes

Google Classroom 1st: 4b6d3m 2nd: 68zu7vk 3rd: 01gru7e 4th: 3qn61k8 6th: r7fp1v8

Remind: Send the following Message to 81010 1st: @mhenne 2nd:@mhennes 3rd: @mhenness 4th: @mhennesse 6th: @mhennessey

AP Insight Go to the following website (https://cb.academicmerit.com/register) and enter the codes below 1st: EY7A769 2nd: FFN4LNT 3rd: AT4HXLE 4th: HJPFY7W 6th: T66EA7J

 

Here is a link to a digital version of your textbook

 

Follow our summer trip on Twitter or like it on facebook.

 

AP Curriculum Guide
Links and Resources
Class Calendar
Rubric's for Essays
Format for DBQ
  Take an AP Insight Quiz
CHS Model United Nations Team
Travel: AP World Field Studies
AP World History Source Book
Centennial High School
  AP Material Archive
Contact Mr. Hennessey
Contact Mr. Hoge
Hoge's & Skelton's AP US History
Practice Test Questions password is knights

 

Quick Links

 

Period to 600 BCE  -  Period from 600 BCE to 600 CE   -  Period from 600 to 1450  -  Period from 1450 to 1750  -  Period from 1750 to 1900Period from 1900 to today

 

Day: 10 - 20 - 30 - 40 - 50 - 60 - Days 65 to 89 - Days 90 to 133 - Days 134 to 174

 

Your Guide to Hennessey/Hoge AP World History

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

1

Dates:

n/a

K.C. #:

n/a

Key Concept:

Mr. Hoge's class will lead to success if students do everything they are asked to the best of their ability and maintain a positive attitude.

Our Topic:

Former student G.A. & A.B.

Required

Pre-Reading:

History of the World in Six Glasses, by Tom Standage

Essential Question(s):

What is required for success in AP World History?

Material to Master:

-Course Guide

-Website

-Expectations

Documents to be utilized:

-Course Guide

-Syllabus

- http://www.whsliberalarts.org/apworldhistory.htm

 

In Class:

Discuss organization of class, expectations, and syllabus

Homework:

.video

Flashcards

-Migration from Africa

-Paleolithic Period

-Hunter-forager

-Nomadic

-Irrigation (include examples)

-Domestication

-Patriarchy

-Pastoralism (include where)

-Agriculturalists (include where)

-Specialization of Labor (include why)

-Technological innovations of the Neolithic Era (5 of them)

Period 1: to 600 BCE

 Technological and Environmental Transformation

AKA: Ancient

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

2

Dates:

to 600 BCE

K.C. #:

1.1,1.2,1.3

Key Concept:

Archeological evidence indicates that during the Paleolithic era, hunting-foraging bands of humans gradually migrated from origins in East Africa to Eurasia, Australia, and America, adapting their technology and culture to new climates.

Our Topic:

Human Migrations in the Paleolithic Era

Required

Pre-Reading:

 

Essential Question(s):

ENV-4 Explain how environmental factors influenced human migrations and settlements.

ENV-5 Explain how human migrations affected the environment.

ENV-6 Explain how people used technology to overcome geographic barriers to migration over time.

Material to Master:

 Humans developed increasingly diverse and sophisticated tools-including multiple uses of fire-as they adapted to new environments. (1.1. I. A)

 Possibly as a response to climatic change, permanent agricultural villages emerged first in the lands of the eastern Mediterranean. Agriculture emerged independently in Mesopotamia, the Nile River Valley, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Indus River Valley, the Yellow River or Huang He Valley, Papua New Guinea, Mesoamerica, and the Andes. (1.2. I. A)

 People in each region domesticated locally available plants and animals. (1.2. I. B)

 Pastoralism developed in Afro-Eurasian grasslands, negatively affecting the environment when lands were overgrazed. (1.2. I. C)

 Agricultural communities had to work cooperatively to clear land and create the water control systems needed for crop production, drastically affecting environmental diversity. (1.2. I. D)

 Pastoralism and agriculture led to more reliable and abundant food supplies, which increased the population and led to specialization of labor, including new classes of artisans and warriors, and the development of elites. (1.2. II. A)

 Technological innovations led to improvements in agricultural production, trade, and transportation. (1.2. II. B)

 Core and foundational civilizations developed in a variety of geographical and environmental settings where agriculture flourished, including Mesopotamia in the Tigris and Euphrates River Valleys, Egypt in the Nile River Valley, Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa in the Indus River Valley, Shang in the Yellow River or Huang He Valley, Olmecs in Mesoamerica, and Chavνn in Andean South America. (ENV-2, 4) (1.3. I)

 As states grew and competed for land and resources, the more favorably situated - including the Hittites, who had access to iron - had greater access to resources, produced more surplus food, and experienced growing populations, enabling them to undertake territorial expansion and conquer surrounding states. (1. 3. II B)

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

AP Insight: Pre-assessment: Student Progress Sheet

 

AP Insight: Challenge Area 2: Causation: Humans & the Environment, Building Block A: Performance Tasks -- Causes & Effects of Early Migrations

Homework:

Prepare for Geography Quiz on Friday click here

&/or:

 

&

 

Flashcards:

 

Turn in day after tomorrow:

-Domestication Map

Directions for Agricultural Revolution Map The Map

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

3

Dates:

50,000 to 10,000 years ago

K.C. #:

1.1.I.A-C

Key Concept:

Archeological evidence indicates that during the Paleolithic era, hunting-foraging bands of humans gradually migrated from origins in East Africa to Eurasia, Australia, and America, adapting their technology and culture to new climates.

Our Topic:

Lascaux, France

Required

Pre-Reading:

 

 

Essential Question(s):

Why are humans found in almost every region of the world?

Material to Master:

-Migration from Africa

-Typical lifestyle of a Paleolithic Human

Documents to be utilized:

-Cave Paintings from Chauvet and Lascaux

-Mother Goddess of Catal Huyuk

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 2 Causation: Human's and the Environment, Building Block A Quiz

Discuss results and next steps

 

Analyzing visual documents using W6C

 

Paleolithic: Lascaux Caves

 

Neolithic: Mother Goddess of Catal Huyuk

Homework:

AP Insight: Read this article and complete one of the reading strategies linked below as you read.  Bring the completed strategy to class tomorrow

Strategy Options

Cornell Notes OR Text Annotation

Optional:

Listen:  Click Here Mann, Charles C. "On the Americas before Columbus."  History for the Future. Interview with Kevin Brown. Pittsburg, PA: WRTC 88.3. 2010. Radio.

Flashcards:

 

Turn in next class:

-Agricultural Revolution Map & complete reading stragegy

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

4

Dates:

10,000 to 4,000 years ago

K.C. #:

1.2.I-II

Key Concept:

Around 10,000 years ago the domestication of plants and animals led to new and more complex economic and social systems which transformed human societies.

Our Topic:

Transition from Neolithic to Paleolithic

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

9-16, 102-103 or web lesson

Essential Question(s):

SB-4 Compare how social, cultural, and environmental factors influenced state formation, expansion, and dissolution.

SB-6 Assess the relationships between states with centralized governments and those without, including pastoral and agricultural societies.

Material to Master:

-Differences between Paleolithic and Neolithic Societies

-Process and impact of domestication

-Difference between Pastoral and Agrarian societies

-Key technologies of the Neolithic Age

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

Turn in Agricultural Revolution Maps

 

AP Insight: Challenge Area 1 Periodization: State Building, Expansion and Conflict Self-Assessment

 

AP Insight: Challenge Area 1 Periodization: State Building, Expansion and Conflict, Building Block A

Performance Tasks: Periodization: Transition Paleolithic to Neolithic

 

 

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

16-19   optional video

&/or:

Crash Course

Flashcards:

 

-River-Valley Civilizations

-Locations of first civilizations (6)

-City-State

-Civilization

-Mesopotamia Origins

-Babylon

-Mesopotamian Government

-Epic of Gilgamesh

-Code of Hammurabi

Turn in next class:

-Summer Reading Test & Geography Quiz Tomorrow click here

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

5

Dates:

3500-1500 BCE

K.C. #:

1.3.I,II.A,III.A-D,F-H

Key Concept:

Core & foundational civilizations developed in a variety of settings where agriculture flourished, here the first states emerged, these states where unified by a common culture.

Our Topic:

Mesopotamia

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

16-19 &/or web lesson

Essential Question(s):

What where the basic characteristics of early civilizations?

Material to Master:

-Location of first civilizations

-Type of government, its role and power, and the link between religion and power in early civilizations

-Factors that allowed them to expand and conquer

-Aspects of culture that unite a people with the Epic of Gilgamesh as an example

-Social Structure in early civilizations

-Trade patterns of the time

Documents to be utilized:

-The Epic of Gilgamesh

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 1 Periodization: State Building, Expansion and Conflict, Building Block A Quiz

Discuss results and next steps

 

Test on Summer Reading

 

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

19-24, 69-73

&:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 1 Periodization: State Building, Expansion and Conflict, Building Block A Quiz Next Steps

Flashcards:

-Iron Weapons

-Chariot

-Hittites

-Mesopotamian Social Class

-Mesopotamian Religion

Turn in next class:

·       Turn in "Next Step"

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

6

Dates:

3500-1500 BCE

K.C. #:

1.3.I,II,III

Key Concept:

Core & foundational civilizations developed in a variety of settings where agriculture flourished, here the first states emerged, these states where unified by a common culture.

Our Topic:

Mesopotamia

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

19-24, 69-73 &/or web lesson

Essential Question(s):

What can we learn about a society from its law code?

Material to Master:

-States developed law codes that reflected existing hierarchies and facilitated the rule of government

Documents to be utilized:

-Code of Hammurabi

In Class:

River Valley 101, common characteristics of Early Civilizations

Epic of Gilgamesh discussion

 

Students read, translate into modern prose, and explain some of the laws in Hammurabi's Code.  Students use this data to construct a basic social hierarchy for Mesopotamia

 

 

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

24-31      optional video

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

-Gift of the Nile aka Miracle of the Nile

-Pharaoh (full explanation)

-Ma'at

-Religion of Pharaonic Egypt

-Pyramids

-Hieroglyphics

-Gender in Egypt

-Trade in Pharaonic Egypt (include Nubia)

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

7

Dates:

3500-1500 BCE

K.C. #:

1.3.I,II,III

Key Concept:

Core & foundational civilizations developed in a variety of settings where agriculture flourished, here the first states emerged, these states where unified by a common culture.

Our Topic:

Egypt

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

24-31 or web lesson

Essential Question(s):

What can we learn about Egyptian society from the documents they left behind?

Material to Master:

-Cultures have unifying characteristics including architecture, art, record keeping, laws, religion, & literature

Documents to be utilized:

-The Egyptian Negative Confession Book of the Dead, Chapter 125

-"Advise for Egyptian Students" in "Readings in World History." Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1998)

-"A Coffin Text" in The Ancient World: Readings in Social and Cultural History (3rd Edition) D. Brendan Nagle & Stanley M. Burstein

-Tomb Paintings in Discovering the Global Past: A Look at the Evidence, Volume I: To 1650 Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, William Bruce Wheeler, Franklin Doeringer, Kenneth R. Curtis

-Hymn to the Nile & Hymn to the Pharaoh

-"A Scribal Exercise Book" in The Human Record: to 1700 by Alfred J. Andrea & James H. Overfield

In Class:

Jig-saw: students divide into 6 groups, each with a different document from Egypt, they W6C the document, then prepare a report for the class explaining what they learned about life in Ancient Egypt.

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

73-76

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

-Hyksos/Hittite Contribution to Egypt & Mesopotamia

-Diffusion

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

8

Dates:

1700-1100BCE

K.C. #:

1.3.I,II,III

Key Concept:

The first states emerged within core civilizations.

Our Topic:

Egypt

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

73-76

Essential Question(s):

How did interactions between societies lead to development?

Material to Master:

-Pastoralists were often the developers & disseminators of new weapons and modes of transportation that transformed warfare in agrarian societies

Documents to be utilized:

-Egyptian depiction of the invasion of the Hyksos

In Class:

Discuss image of Hyksos invasion

Complete activity from yesterday

 

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

84-90, 112-116

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

-Israel

-Judaism (include a summary of beliefs)

-Monotheism

-All names for the founders of Judaism

-Hebrew Bible

-Jewish Diaspora (what, who caused it (3 groups), & so what

-Covenant

-Zoroastrianism

Turn in next class:

-Read Excerpt from Hebrew Bible & answer questions for analysis on pages 88-89.  Provide thorough answers that specifically cite information in the document to support your conclusions

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

9

Dates:

2000-500BCE

K.C. #:

1.3.III.E & 2.1.I.A

Key Concept:

Religion as an element of culture, played significant role in unifying states & had a lasting impact on society.  With time, codification and further developments of these religious traditions provided a bond among people and an ethical code to live by.

Our Topic:

The Hebrews and JUDAISM

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

84-90, 112-116 or web lesson

 

Essential Question(s):

How did the religion of each civilization make them unique?

Material to Master:

-The beliefs to Judaism

-Judaism was unique, however if reflected many beliefs the Mesopotamian world from which it emerged.

-The Hebrew Bible created an ethical code to live by

-Jewish states where conquered and dispersed several times resulting in many Jewish communities around the Mediterranean World.

-Beliefs Zoroastrianism

Documents to be utilized:

-Selections from Deuteronomy, Hebrew Bible and Hammurabi's Code

 

In Class:

 

Questions for analysis due

Students examine a selection of Deuteronomic Codes and Hammurabi's Code.  In groups they will sort them into two categories:  "unique to the Hebrews" & "reflects Mesopotamian influence" (i.e. like Hammurabi's Codes)

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

173-178, 180-190

optional video

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

-Kyber Pass

-Vedic Age India

-Varna

-Caste System

-Reincarnation

-Rig Veda

-Hinduism

-Sanskrit

-Brahma

-Indian Epics

-Hindu Temples

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

10

Dates:

1500BCE-1025CE

K.C. #:

1.3.III.E, 2.1.I.B, 2.1.V.A&B

Key Concept:

Religion as an element of culture, played significant role in unifying states & had a lasting impact on society.  With time, codification and further developments of these religious traditions provided a bond among people and an ethical code to live by. 

Artistic expressions associated with each culture, including literature, drama, visual arts, and architecture show distinctive cultural developments

Our Topic:

Early India

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

173-178, 180-190

Essential Question(s):

How did the religion of India make the culture of the region unique?

Material to Master:

-The Vedic Age religion of India evolved into Hinduism which has shaped India's history

-The core beliefs outlined in the Sanskrit scripture formed the basis of the Vedic religion – later known as Hinduism – which contributed to the development of the social & political roles of a caste system and in the importance of multiple manifestations of Brahma to promote teachings about reincarnation

-Literature, including Indian Epics like the Ramayana, acquired distinctive forms that influenced artistic development in other areas and in other later times

-Distinctive architecture styles, like Hindu temples of the Gupta Dynasty, developed in many regions in this period (600BCE to 600CE).

Documents to be utilized:

-Modern image of the incarnations of Vishnu

-Multiple photographs of Hindu Temples

In Class:

Lecture with graphic organizer on the basic beliefs of Hinduism and the results of these beliefs on culture.

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

178-180, 218, 129-135

&/or: they work

http://whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaythirtytwo_files/frame.htm

http://whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaytwentyfive_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Buddhism

-Bodhisattvas

-Enlightenment

-Sutras

-Mahayana Buddhism

-Ashoka

-Monasticism

-Four Noble Truths

-Hellenistic Age

Turn in next class:

- 

Period 2: 600 BCE to 600 CE

 Organization and Reorganization of Human Society

AKA: Classical Age

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

11

Dates:

700BCE – 600CE

K.C. #:

2.1.II.A & 2.1.III

Key Concept:

New Belief systems and cultural traditions emerged and spread, often asserting universal truths.

Belief systems affected gender roles.

Our Topic:

Buddhism

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

178-180, 218, 129-135 or web lesson

Essential Question(s):

How did classical age religions like Buddhism both maintain and depart from the beliefs of older religions like Hinduism?

How did cross cultural interactions start to be evident in these classical age religions?

Material to Master:

-The core beliefs about desire, suffering, and the search for enlightenment preached by Buddha and recorded in the sutras and other scriptures were, in part, a reaction to the Vedic beliefs and rituals dominant in South Asia.  Buddhism changed over time as it spread throughout Asia – first through the support of the Mauryan Emperor Ashoka, and then through the efforts of missionaries and merchants, and the establishment of educational institutions to promote its core beliefs

-The convergence of Greek culture, by way of Alexander the Great, and Buddhist beliefs affected the development of unique sculpture demonstrating that in this period, religion as an aspect of culture started to overlap geographic regions

-Buddhist monasticism impacted the position of women

Documents to be utilized:

-Heracles depiction of Vajrapani as the protector of the Buddha, 2nd century Gandhara

In Class:

Lecture on core beliefs and practices of Buddhism & its spread with a graphic organizer

Discussion of image of Buddha

 

Period One Project Assigned

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

40-41, 44-51    optional video

&/or:

http://whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaynine_files/frame.htm

slides 1-5 & 13-17 only, all of the second web lesson

http://whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayten_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Geography of China

-Zhou Dynasty (full explanation)

-Mandate of Heaven

-Confucianism

-Daoism

-Yin / Yang

-Filial Piety

-Ancestor Veneration

Turn in next class:

-Read pages 48-49 (Analects of Confucius & Legalist writings) and answer questions for analysis, bring book to class.

-Be prepared for a scored Socratic Seminar on: How would our lives be different if America adhered to Confucian beliefs?

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

12

Dates:

1045BCE-221BCE

K.C. #:

2.1.II.B & C, 2.1.III, 2.1.IV.B

Key Concept:

New Belief systems and cultural traditions emerged and spread, often asserting universal truths.

Belief systems affected gender roles

Other (often older) religious and cultural traditions continued parallel to the codified, written belief systems in core civilizations.

Our Topic:

New Belief systems: Confucianism & Daoism

Other older: Ancestor Veneration

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

40-41, 44-51 or web lesson

Essential Question(s):

How did classical age belief systems like Confucianism & Daoism both maintain and depart from the beliefs of older traditions?

Material to Master:

-Confucianism's core beliefs and writing originated in the writings and lessons of Confucius and were elaborated by key disciples who sought to promote social harmony by outlining proper rituals and social relationships for all people in China, including the rulers.

-In major Daoist writings, the core belief of balance between humans and nature assumed that the Chinese political system would be altered indirectly.  Daoism also influenced the development of Chinese culture as evident in poetry

Documents to be utilized:

-Analects of Confucius and the Legalist writings of Han Fei in Bulliet

In Class:

Socratic Seminar

Common Text: Analects

Key Question: How would our lives be different if America adhered to Confucian Beliefs?

 

Seminar Expectations

 

Questions for analysis due

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

141, 152-156, 218-220, 267-269

option:

http://whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaytwentyeight_files/frame.htm

 

Flashcards:

-Christianity (origins & core beliefs)

-Christianity in Rome

-Spread of Christianity

-Emperor Constantine

-Christian Monastic Life

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

13

Dates:

6 CE – 300 CE

K.C. #:

2.1.II.B, 2.1.III

Key Concept:

New Belief systems and cultural traditions emerged and spread, often asserting universal truths.

Belief systems affected gender roles.

Our Topic:

Christianity

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

141, 152-156, 218-220, 267-269

Essential Question(s):

How did classical age religions like Christianity both maintain and depart from the beliefs of older religions like Judaism?

Material to Master:

-Christianity, based on core beliefs about the teachings and divinity of Jesus of Nazareth as recorded by his disciples, drew on Judaism, and initially rejected Roman and Hellenistic influences.  Despite initial Roman imperial hostility, Christianity spread through the efforts of missionaries and merchants through many parts of Afro-Eurasia, and eventually gained Roman imperial support by the time of Emperor Constantine.

-Christian monastic life gave women an option of independence.

Documents to be utilized:

  • Christian Bible: John 3:16

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 7 Contextualization: Interaction of Religion and Society, Building Block A

Performance Tasks: Time and Place: Buddhism and Christianity Develop

 

 

 

 

 

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

57: Beliefs & Knowledge, 60-61: Religion & Power,

&:

Click Here Read Abstract & The Role of the Shaman including Traditional World View, The Initiation, The Professional Practice.  NOTE if you have seen the movie Gran Torino, then you have seen what the article is talking about.

Complete Cornell Notes with this reading.  Click here for the direction, please complete exactly as directed. Cornell Notes

Flashcards:

- 

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

14

Dates:

All of time

K.C. #:

2.1.IV.A

Key Concept:

Other religious and cultural traditions continued parallel to the codified, written belief systems in core civilizations.

Our Topic:

Shamanism & Animism

Greek Philosophy

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

57: Beliefs & Knowledge, 60-61: Religion & Power, plus article about Hmong

Essential Question(s):

What ancient philosophies & religious customs have served throughout history despite widespread conversion to dominate religions we have studied?

Material to Master:

-Shamanism and animism continued to shape the lives of people within and outside of core civilizations because of their daily reliance on the natural world.

-The core ideas in Greco-   Roman philosophy and science emphasized logic, empirical observation, and the nature of political power and hierarchy.

Documents to be utilized:

-Hmong Shamanism Animist Spiritual Healing in Minnesota by Gregory Plotnikoff, Charles Numrich, Chu Wu, Deu Yang, and Phua Xiong

-The Heathen Temple at Uppsala byAdam of Bremen

 ·    Plato's Cave Allegory

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 7 Contextualization: Interaction of Religion and Society, Building Block A Quiz

 

The Ancient and Classical periods included major changes to religion, including the rise of the six of new faiths we have already discussed.  Today we will see that their was actually one more change: the rise of a philosophy that questioned the very idea of faith and an important continuity: a faith that was largely unchanged since the Paleolithic period.   

 

CONTINUITY:  Point of View exercise: Christian perceptions of Shamanism and animism

-        Student perceptions of Hmong article

-        Adam of Bremen's perception of the Scandinavians

 

     CHANGE:  Students read and discuss Plato's Cave Allegory

Homework:

AP Insight: Complete Next Steps - due tomorrow

Study for TEST

 

Optional outside of class enrichment

Preparation for

Day:

19

Dates:

to 600

Topic #:

Key Concept: Period 2.2.I-III

Our Topic:

Period 1-2

Date:

Time:

Location:

Duration:

MONDAY

4-6pm

Learning Commons

2 hours

Activity:

Review of Key Concepts, Flash Card Cram, Team Quiz

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

15

Dates:

 600 BCE to 600CE

K.C. #:

1.1.I to 2.1.V

Our Topic:

Classical Age Religion

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

 

Essential Question(s):

How have religions, belief systems, philosophies, and ideologies affected the development of societies over time? [CUL-4 and 5]

Material to Master:

-New Belief systems and cultural traditions emerged and spread, often asserting universal truths.

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

AP Insight: Pre-Assessment: Student Progress Sheet

AP Insight: Challenge Area 3: Comparison: Influence of Beliefs on Social Structures, Building Block A: Performance Tasks – Social Comparison: Influence of Early Religions

Rubric

Homework:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 3: Comparison: Influence of Beliefs on Social Structures, Building Block A: Quiz & Next Steps

Optional:

 Buillet: 105, 135, 193-194, 309-310

Flashcards:

 

Turn in next class:

 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

16

Dates:

600 BCE-600CE

K.C. #:

2.2.I

Key Concept:

The number and size of key states and empires grew dramatically by imposing political unity on areas where previously there had been competing states.

Our Topic:

12 Key States/Empires

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

105, 135, 193-194, 309-310

Essential Question(s):

What did the map look like in the back of Jesus's social studies class?

Material to Master:

-Location and name of the 12 key states/empires in the classical age

Documents to be utilized:

-Nystrom Historical Atlas

In Class:

Map Lecture

 OR

Buillet: 105, 135, 193-194, 309-310

 

 

Students create a political map of the classical world with brief histories of each of the 14 key states. Due on day 20

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

141-150

&/or:

http://whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaytwentysix_files/frame.htm

http://whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaytwentyseven_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Roman Republic

-Roman Law

-Roman Society (include Patriarchy)

-Roman Government (over time)

-Roman Expansion

-Roman Slavery

Turn in next class:

Map due day 20

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

17

Dates:

400BCE-400CE

K.C. #:

2.1.II.E, 2.2.I-III

Key Concept:

New belief systems and cultural traditions emerged and spread, often asserting universal truths (Greco-Roman Philosophy)

Empires and states developed new techniques of imperial administration based, in part, on the success of earlier political forms

 

Our Topic:

Rome

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

141-150 or web lessons

Essential Question(s):

How did the Roman Empire come to be so powerful?

Material to Master:

-In order to organize their subjects, rulers created administrative institutions like centralized government with elaborate legal systems and bureaucracies.

-Imperial governments projected military power over large areas using diplomacy, supply lines, fortifications, defensive walls, roads, and the inclusion of conquered peoples in their military

Documents to be utilized:

-Plutarch's Lives, Paragraph 57

-Ammianus Marcellinus, History, XIV.16: "The Luxury of the Rich in Rome," c. 400 AD Paragraph – 1

In Class:

AP Insight: Pre-assessment: Student Progress Sheet

 

AP Insight: Challenge Area I Periodization: State Building, Expansion, and Conflict, Building Block B: Performance Task – Periodization: Expansion and Dissolution of States

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

150-157

&/or:

http://whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaytwentysix_files/frame.htm

http://whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaytwentyseven_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Roman Roads

-Pax Romana

-Rome (function of the city)

-Roman Social Class

Turn in next class:

 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

18

Dates:

31BCE -400CE

K.C. #:

2.2.II.C & 2.2.III.A-D

Key Concept:

Empires and states developed new techniques of imperial administration based, in part, on the success of earlier political forms

Unique social and economic dimensions developed in imperial societies in imperial societies in Afro-Eurasia and the Americas

Our Topic:

Rome

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

150-157

Essential Question(s):

What can we learn about Rome from its graffiti?

Material to Master:

-In order to organize their subjects, rulers created administrative institutions like centralized government with elaborate legal systems and bureaucracies.

-Imperial governments projected military power over large areas using diplomacy, supply lines, fortifications, defensive walls, roads, and the inclusion of conquered peoples in their military

-Much of the success of the empire rested on their promotion of trade and economic integration by building and maintaining roads and issuing currencies

-Cities served as centers of trade, public performance of religious rituals, and political administration for states and empires

-The social structure of empires displayed hierarchies that included cultivators, laborers, slaves, artisans, merchants, elites, or caste groups

-Imperial societies relied on a range of methods to maintain the production of food and provide rewards for the loyalty of the elite

-Patriarchy continued to shape the gender and family relations in all imperial societies of the period

Documents to be utilized:

-Wall Inscriptions from Pompeii from Readings in Ancient History: Illustrative Extracts from the Sources, William Stearns Davis, ed.,

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area I, Building Block B Quiz

Discuss Results

 

Students will read various documents from the republic and empire and sort it into a graphic organizer based on AP Theme and  "Material to Master" bullet it provides evidence of

Homework:

AP Insight: Challenge Area I, Building Block B Quiz Next Steps

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

 

Turn in next class:

Flash Cards for unit one

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

19

Dates:

400BCE-400CE

K.C. #:

2.2.I-III

Our Topic:

Classical Age

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

157-167

In Class:

TEST

 

 

 

 

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

157-167

&/or:

 http://whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaythirty_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Xiongnu

-Han Society (include social class & Patriarchy)

-Chang'an (function of the city)

-Gentry

-Han Government

-Han Expansion

-Han Trade

Turn in next class:

-  Political Map of Classical World

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

20

Dates:

200BCE-200CE

K.C. #:

2.2.I-III

Key Concept:

Empires and states developed new techniques of imperial administration based, in part, on the success of earlier political forms

Unique social and economic dimensions developed in imperial societies in imperial societies in Afro-Eurasia and the Americas

Our Topic:

Han China

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

166-167

Essential Question(s):

How did the Han Empire come to be so powerful?

Material to Master:

-Much of the success of the empire rested on their promotion of trade and economic integration by building and maintaining roads and issuing currencies

-Cities served as centers of trade, public performance of religious rituals, and political administration for states and empires

-The social structure of empires displayed hierarchies that included cultivators, laborers, slaves, artisans, merchants, elites, or caste groups

-Imperial societies relied on a range of methods to maintain the production of food and provide rewards for the loyalty of the elite

-Patriarchy continued to shape the gender and family relations in all imperial societies of the period

Documents to be utilized:

-Map of Chang'an

In Class:

Textbook sort: student are each given several photo copied lines from the textbook reading from the night before.  They are asked to sort them by AP theme and then determine which would be considered essential information based on the "Material to Master" (aka key concepts)

 

Maps due

 

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

 182-190 & click here

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

- Decline of the Gupta Empire

-Decline of the Mauryan Empire

-Decline of the Persian Empire

Turn in next class:

UG Project Due Tomorrow

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

21

Dates:

200C –600CE

K.C. #:

2.2.IV.A-B

Key Concept:

The Roman, Han, Persian, Mauryan, and Gupta empires created political, cultural, and administrative difficulties that they could not manage, which eventually led to their decline, collapse, and transformation into successor empires or states.

Our Topic:

Rome, Han, Achaemenid Persians, Mauryan, and Gupta decline

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

182-190  & click here

Essential Question(s):

Why do empires fall?

Material to Master:

-Students will discover

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

Project: In groups students will evaluate the decline of the Roman, Han, Achaemenid Persian, Mauryan, and Gupta empires and identify commonalities.  Groups must create a paradigm of imperial decline.  The paradigm must include at least five factors leading to decline including political, environmental, social, economic, and external issues.

 

Students must present their paradigms to the class and defend it with ample historical evidence from all of the empires.

 

Homework:

 

 

- Work on project

- Additional resource

-Readings in class

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

22

Dates:

200C –600CE

K.C. #:

2.2.IV.A-B

Key Concept:

The Roman, Han, Persian, Mauryan, and Gupta empires created political, cultural, and administrative difficulties that they could not manage, which eventually led to their decline, collapse, and transformation into successor empires or states.

Our Topic:

Rome, Han, Achaemenid Persians, Mauryan, and Gupta decline

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

 

Essential Question(s):

Why do empires fall?

Skill to Master:

-Crafting historical arguments from historical evidence

-Historical Interpretation & Synthesis

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

Work on project

Homework:

 

 

- Projects due at start of next class

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

23

Dates:

200C –600CE

K.C. #:

2.2.IV.A-B

Key Concept:

The Roman, Han, Persian, Mauryan, and Gupta empires created political, cultural, and administrative difficulties that they could not manage, which eventually led to their decline, collapse, and transformation into successor empires or states.

Our Topic:

Rome, Han, Achaemenid Persians, Mauryan, and Gupta decline

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

 

Essential Question(s):

Why do empires fall?

Skill to Master:

-Crafting historical arguments from historical evidence

-Historical Interpretation & Synthesis

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

Present projects and defend

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

201-206

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaythirtyseven_files/frame.htm

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaythirtyeight_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Silk Road Phase One

-Classical Age Central Asia

-Stirrup

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

24

Dates:

300BCE-600CE

K.C. #:

All of Period 2

Key Concept:

All of Period 2

Our Topic:

Period 2

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

 

Essential Question(s):

What patterns and events makes the period from 600 BCE to 600 CE a logical block of time to organize world history into?

Material to Master:

-AP Themes as they relate to Period 2

-Chronological Reasoning: Periodization

-Comparison and Contextualization

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

AP World History Idol Project

Students have to rewrite a popular song with lyric that justify the use of 600 BCE to 600 CE as appropriate dates to organization history based on patterns and events related to each of the AP Themes.

 

 

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

94-95,

&:

 

Flashcards:

-Mediterranean Sea Trade in the Classical Age

Turn on day before test class:

-AP World History Idol

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

25

Dates:

300BCE-600CE

K.C. #:

2.3.I-III

Key Concept:

Land and water routes became the basis for transregional trade, communication, and exchange networks in the Eastern Hemisphere.

New technologies facilitated long-distance communication and exchange.

Alongside the trade in goods, the exchange of people, technology, religious and cultural beliefs, food crops, domesticated animals, and disease pathogens developed across far-flung networks of communication and exchange.

Our Topic:

Silk Road

Stirrups

Camels

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

201-206 or weblesson

Essential Question(s):

How did the silk road link the east with the west?

Material to Master:

-Many factors including climate & location of routes, the typical goods, and the ethnicity of people involved, shaped the distinctive features of the silk road

-New technologies permitted the use of domestic pack animals to transport goods across longer routes

Documents to be utilized:

-Nystrom Atlas of World History

In Class:

Map Activity, Students create a map of the economic, cultural, & technological exchange that took place on the silk road

Reading for Map

Homework:

Read Plagues & People

by William H. McNeil

Pages 125-130

if you have trouble getting it to load, right click and download

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

-Classical Age Epidemics

Turn in next class:

-Bring annotated reading to class, turn in map

Reading for Map

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

26

Dates:

300BCE-600CE

K.C. #:

2.3.III

Key Concept:

Alongside the trade in goods, the exchange of people, technology, religious and cultural beliefs, food crops, domesticated animals, and disease pathogens developed across far-flung networks of communication and exchange.

Our Topic:

Effects of disease on the Roman Empire

Required

Pre-Reading:

 

Read Plagues & People

by William H. McNeil pg 125-130

Essential Question(s):

Why and how does the movement of people cause the outbreak of disease?

Material to Master:

-The spread of disease pathogens diminished urban populations and contributed to the decline of empires

Documents to be utilized:

-Except from: Plagues & People

by William H. McNeil

-Except from: Past pandemics that ravaged Europe By Verity Murphy BBC News

In Class:

Groups summarizing activity of Plagues & People & Past pandemics that ravaged Europe

 

Map due

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

217-220, 191-193

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaythirtyeight_files/frame.htm

MUST read pages 198-199

Flashcards:

-Classical Age Spread of Christianity

-Classical Age Spread of Buddhism

-Classical Age Spread of Hinduism

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

27

Dates:

300BCE-600CE

K.C. #:

2.3.III.C

Key Concept:

Alongside the trade in goods, the exchange of people, technology, religious and cultural beliefs, food crops, domesticated animals, and disease pathogens developed across far-flung networks of communication and exchange.

Our Topic:

Christianity, Hinduism, & Buddhism

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

217-220, 191-193

Essential Question(s):

How does trade foster the spread of religion?

Material to Master:

-Religious and cultural traditions were transformed as they spread

Documents to be utilized:

-Except from Old World Encounters by Jerry Bentley

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 7 Contextualization: Interactions of Religions and Society, Building Block D: Performance Task – Contextualization: Expansion and Cultural Change

 

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

211-215

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayforty_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Trans-Saharan Caravan Routes

-Camel Saddle

Turn in next class:

- 

Optional outside of class enrichment

Preparation for

Day:

32

Dates:

to 600

Topic #:

Key Concept: Period 2.2.I-III

Our Topic:

Period 1-2

Date:

Time:

Location:

Duration:

TBA

4-6pm

Learning Commons

2 hours

Activity:

Review of Key Concepts, Flash Card Cram, Team Quiz

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

28

Dates:

300BCE-600CE

K.C. #:

2.3.I-III

Key Concept:

Land and water routes became the basis for transregional trade, communication, and exchange networks in the Eastern Hemisphere.

New technologies facilitated long-distance communication and exchange.

Alongside the trade in goods, the exchange of people, technology, religious and cultural beliefs, food crops, domesticated animals, and disease pathogens developed across far-flung networks of communication and exchange.

Our Topic:

Trans-Saharan Caravan Routes and the Camel

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

217-221

Essential Question(s):

How did the Trans-Saharan caravan routes link north Africa with regions south of the Sahara?

Material to Master:

-Many factors including climate & location of routes, the typical goods, and the ethnicity of people involved, shaped the distinctive features of the Trans-Sahara caravan routes.

-New technologies permitted the use of domestic pack animals to transport goods across longer routes

Documents to be utilized:

-Ezekiel  - A Lament Over Tyre

-Greek Historian Herodotus, c. 400 BCE Description of the  

            North Africans

-Dio, Roman History (XLIII.23.1-2) – c. 46 BCE

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 7 Contextualization: Interactions of Religions and Society, Building Block D: Quiz

 

Camel Saddles over time

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

207-210

& AP Insight: Next Step

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaythirtynine_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Lateen Sail

-Classical Age Indian Ocean Maritime System

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

29

Dates:

300BCE-600CE

K.C. #:

2.3.I-III

Key Concept:

Land and water routes became the basis for transregional trade, communication, and exchange networks in the Eastern Hemisphere.

New technologies facilitated long-distance communication and exchange.

Alongside the trade in goods, the exchange of people, technology, religious and cultural beliefs, food crops, domesticated animals, and disease pathogens developed across far-flung networks of communication and exchange.

Our Topic:

Indian Ocean Sea Lanes

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

207-210

Essential Question(s):

How did the Indian Ocean sea lanes link the east with the west?

Material to Master:

-Innovations in maritime technology like the Lateen Sails, as well as advanced knowledge of the monsoon winds, stimulated exchange along maritime routes from East Africa to East Asia

-The spread of crops like rice and cotton from South Asia to the Middle East encouraged changes in farming and irrigation techniques like the qanat system

-Religious and cultural traditions were transformed as they spread

Documents to be utilized:

-Faxian, Travels -- Description of Homeward Voyage (Andrea Overfield pg 168)

In Class:

Students deconstruct Faxian's travels

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

208-209

Option

 get started on tomorrows homework, its sort of a lot

Flashcards:

- 

Turn in next class:

·       

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

30

Dates:

600BCE-600CE

K.C. #:

All of period 2

Key Concept:

All of period 2

Our Topic:

 

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

 

Essential Question(s):

What makes the Classical Age a distinct period in World History

Skill to Master:

- Periodization

Documents to be utilized:

 

In Class:

 

AP World History Idol Presentations – We're going to Hollywood!!

Homework:

 

 

Watch ALL of the following:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylWORyToTo4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPf27gAup9U

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PszVWZNWVA

And read this

Han Government 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

31

Dates:

600BCE-600CE

K.C. #:

All of period 2

Key Concept:

All of period 2

Our Topic:

 THE DBQ with Roman and Han China

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

 

Essential Question(s):

What is extended analysis in the DBQ essay?

Material to Master:

-Unit 2!

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

Introduction and practice with extended analysis/p.o.v.

Rubric

 

Practice Documents

Homework:

 

 

·        Unit 2 test next class day

- Flash cards are due for unit 2

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

32

Dates:

600BCE-600CE

K.C. #:

 

In Class:

TEST

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

216-220, 428-430

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

-Bantu Migration

-Swahili

-Polynesian Voyages

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Period 3

600CE to 1450CE

Regional & Transregional Interactions, AKA Medieval Period

Day:

33

Dates:

600  to 1450

K.C. #:

All of Period 3

Key Concept:

600 to 1450 is a period of regional and transregional Interactions

Our Topic:

Period 3 overview

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

216-220, 428-430

Essential Question(s):

What events and patterns between 600 and 1450 make this a logical historical period to study?

Material to Master:

-Medieval world from the moon.

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

Lecture on the Medieval World

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

228-239

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayfortytwo_files/frame.htm

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayfortythree_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Muhammad

-Islam

-Dar al-Islam

-Mecca

-Umma

-Quran

-Sunnis

-Shi'ites

-Expansion of Islam

-Decline of Abbasids

-Abbasid Caliphate

-Persian influence in Islamic World

-Mamluks

-Turks

-Caliphates

-Caliph

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

34

Dates:

600 - 1450

K.C. #:

3.1.III.A, 3.2.II.B & C, 3.1.I.E

Key Concept:

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new states forms emerged.

Interregional contacts and conflicts between states and empires encouraged significant technological and cultural transfer.

Cross-cultural exchanges were fostered by the intensification of existing, or the creation of new, networks of trade and communication.

 Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices led to an increased volume of trade, and expanded the geographical range of existing and newly active trade networks.

Our Topic:

Dar al-Islam

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

228-239

Essential Question(s):

What factors led to the rise of Islam and how did it impact the surrounding world?

Material to Master:

-In some places, like the Middle East, new forms of governance emerged, including the Islamic States

-Some of these states, including the Islamic world, synthesized local and borrowed tradition like the inclusion of Persian traditions.

-Islam, based on the revelations of Muhammad, developed in the Arabian peninsula. The beliefs and practices of Islam reflected interactions among Jews, Christians, and Zoroastrians with the local Arabian peoples.  Muslim rule expanded to many parts of Afro-Eurasia due to military expansion, and Islam subsequently expanded through the activities of merchants and missionaries

-The expansion of empires, like those in the Islamic world, facilitated Trans-Eurasian trade and communication as new people were drawn into the conquerors' economies and trade networks.

Documents to be utilized:

-The Qu'ran, Surah 47: 1-16

-The Qu'ran 17:104-109

-The Qu'ran 5:46

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 7: Contextualization Interaction of Religions and Society, Building Block B: Performance Task – Time and Place: Islam Develops

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

239-248, optional video

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayfortyfive_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Women in the Islamic World

-Cities in the Islamic world

-Ibn Buttuta

-Hadith

-Shari'a

-Impact of Conversion

-Science and technology in the Islamic World

-Sufi

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

34.5

Dates:

600 - 1450

K.C. #:

3.1.III.A, 3.2.II.B & C, 3.1.I.E

Key Concept:

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new states forms emerged.

Interregional contacts and conflicts between states and empires encouraged significant technological and cultural transfer.

Cross-cultural exchanges were fostered by the intensification of existing, or the creation of new, networks of trade and communication.

 Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices led to an increased volume of trade, and expanded the geographical range of existing and newly active trade networks.

Our Topic:

Dar al-Islam

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

228-239

Essential Question(s):

What factors led to the rise of Islam and how did it impact the surrounding world?

Material to Master:

-In some places, like the Middle East, new forms of governance emerged, including the Islamic States

-Some of these states, including the Islamic world, synthesized local and borrowed tradition like the inclusion of Persian traditions.

-Islam, based on the revelations of Muhammad, developed in the Arabian peninsula. The beliefs and practices of Islam reflected interactions among Jews, Christians, and Zoroastrians with the local Arabian peoples.  Muslim rule expanded to many parts of Afro-Eurasia due to military expansion, and Islam subsequently expanded through the activities of merchants and missionaries

-The expansion of empires, like those in the Islamic world, facilitated Trans-Eurasian trade and communication as new people were drawn into the conquerors' economies and trade networks.

Documents to be utilized:

-The Qu'ran, Surah 47: 1-16

-The Qu'ran 17:104-109

-The Qu'ran 5:46

In Class:

Continue:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 7: Contextualization Interaction of Religions and Society, Building Block B: Performance Task – Time and Place: Islam Develops

 

AP Insight: Challenge Area 7: Contextualization Interaction of Religions and Society, Building Block B: Quiz

 

 

Homework:

   

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

 

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

35

Dates:

600 - 1450

K.C. #:

3.3.III.C-D, 3.2.I.B, 3.3.I.C, 3.2.II

Key Concept:

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new states forms emerged.

Interregional contacts and conflicts between states and empires encouraged significant technological and cultural transfer.

Innovations stimulated agricultural and industrial production in many regions

The fate of cities varied greatly, with periods of significant decline, and with periods of increased urbanization buoyed by rising productivity and expanded trade networks

Despite significant continuities in social structures and in methods of production, there were also some important changes in labor management and in the effect of religious conversion on gender relations and family

Our Topic:

Dar al-Islam

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

239-248

Essential Question(s):

What was life like in the Islamic world?

Material to Master:

-In some places, like the Middle East, new forms of governance emerged, including the Islamic States

-Some of these states, including the Islamic world, synthesized local and borrowed tradition

-There was technological transfer between Tang China and the Abbasid Caliphate via the silk road

-Cities played a role as governmental, religious, and commercial centers, new cities emerged in this period

-The demand for slaves for both military and domestic purposes increased, particularly in central Eurasia, parts of Africa and the eastern Mediterranean

-The diffusion of Islam led to significant changes in gender relations and family structure

Documents to be utilized:

-The Sunnah: of Women and Slaves, of government

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 4: Causation: Spread of Knowledge Across Cultures; Building Block B:  Performance Task – Causation: Spread of Knowledge in Eurasia

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

378-382

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaysixtyeight_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Timbuktu

-Medieval Trans-Saharan Trade

-Islam of Sub-Saharan Africa

-Mali

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

36

Dates:

1200-1400

K.C. #:

3.1.I.A, 3.1.III.D, 3.3.II.C & D, 3.2.I.B

Key Concept:

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new states forms emerged.

Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices led to an increased volume of trade, and expanded geographical range of trade routes

The fate of cities varied greatly, with periods of significant decline, and with periods of increased urbanization buoyed by rising productivity and expanded trade networks

Interregional contacts and conflicts between states and empires encouraged significant technological and cultural transfer.

Cross-cultural exchanges were fostered by the intensification of existing, or the creation of new, networks of trade and communication.

Our Topic:

Mali & Timbuktu

Camel Saddle

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

378-382 or web lesson

Essential Question(s):

How did increased trade bring Sub-Saharan Africa into the greater Afro-Eurasian world?

Material to Master:

-Existing trade routes flourished and promoted the growth of powerful new trading cities

-Caravan organization became more sophisticated

-Increased cross-cultural interactions resulted in the diffusion of literary, artistic, and cultural traditions

-New forms of governance emerged including those in the various Islamic states

-The diffusion of Islam led to significant changes in gender and family relations.

Documents to be utilized:

-Map of Western Sudan (1375) in Bulliet 

-Original footage of salt mining in Northern Sahara from Nation Geographic

-Photograph, Mosque of Jenna

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 4: Causation: Spread of Knowledge Across Cultures; Building Block B: Quiz

 

AP Insight: Challenge Area 7: Contextualization Interaction of Religions and Society, Building Block 7: Performance Task –
Contextualization: Belief Systems Expand and Adapt

 

Nystrom Map

 

 

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

382-394

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayseventy_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Swahili

-Medieval Indian Ocean Basin Trade

-Spices

-Ships navigation in the Indian Ocean

-Swahili Coast

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

37

Dates:

600 - 1450

K.C. #:

3.1.I.A, 3.3.I.C

Key Concept:

Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices led to an increased volume of trade, and expanded geographical range of trade routes

Innovations stimulated agricultural and industrial production in many regions

Our Topic:

Indian Ocean Maritime System

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

382-394

Essential Question(s):

How is AP Theme 4 (Economic Systems) related to AP Theme 2 (Interaction of Cultures) and how is this process evident in the Period 2 & 3 (Classical and Medieval)?

Material to Master:

-Existing trade routes flourished and promoted the growth of powerful new trading cities

-Chinese, Persian, and Indian artisans and merchants expanded their production of textiles and porcelains for export

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

Comparative Essay: Compare the impact of trade on culture in West Africa and the region surrounding the Indian Ocean.

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

380-381

&

 AP Insight: Challenge Area 4: Causation: Spread of Knowledge Across Cultures; Building Block B: Quiz Next Steps

Flashcards:

-Ibn Battuta

Turn in next class:

 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

38

Dates:

600 - 1450

K.C. #:

3.1.III.B-D

Key Concept:

Cross-cultural exchanges were fostered by the intensification of existing, or the creation of new, networks of trade and communication.

Our Topic:

Ibn Battuta

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

380-381

Essential Question(s):

What can we learn about the Medieval World from travelers like Ibn Battuta?

Material to Master:

-In key places along important trade routes, merchants set up diasporic communities, like along the East Coast of Africa, where they introduced their cultural traditions into the indigenous

-The writings of certain interregional travelers illustrate both the extent and limitations of intercultural knowledge and understanding

-Increased cross-cultural interactions resulted in the diffusion of literary, artistic, and cultural traditions

Documents to be utilized:

-The Travels of Ibn Battuta in the Near East, Asia, and Africa (1325-1354)

In Class:

 

 

On the Road with Ibn Battuta, students utilize primary source documents from Ibn Battuta to write their own travel log of Medieval World.

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

253-254, 258-267, 400-402, 596, optional video, optional video

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayfortyeight_files/frame.htm

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayfortyseven_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Medieval Europe

-Feudalism

-Invasions of Medieval Europe

-Papacy

-The Black Death

-Wat Tyler

-The Little Ice Age (be sure to note the dates!)

-Medieval European Agriculture

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

39

Dates:

600 - 1450

K.C. #:

3.3.III.C, 3.2.I.B, 3.3.II.A

Key Concept:

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new states emerged.

Despite significant continuities in social structure and in methods of production, there were also some important changes in labor management and in the effects of religious conversion on gender and family life.

The fate of cities varied greatly, with periods of significant decline in Europe and growth in other areas.

Our Topic:

Medieval Europe

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

253-254, 258-267, 400-402, 596

Essential Question(s):

Is "Dark Age" a good name for Europe in this period?

Material to Master:

-As in the previous period, there were many forms of labor organization like peasant agriculture and serfdom

-In some places, new forms of governance emerged, including decentralized government (feudalism) in Europe and Japan

-Multiple factors contributed to the decline of urban areas in this period including: invasions, disease, decline in agricultural production, and climate change

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

Simulation of Feudalism

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

Watch videos at first six bullets at this site

&:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayfiftyfive_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Japanese Feudalism

Turn in next class:

- Essay: Compare the economic and cultural impact of the trans-Saharan and Indian Ocean trade routes from the first century CE to sixteenth century CE.  Write this essay in 40 minutes from memory -- due in class Hoge's tomorrow.

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

40

Dates:

600 - 1450

K.C. #:

3.3.III.C, 3.2.I.B, 3.3.II.A

Key Concept:

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new states emerged.

Despite significant continuities in social structure and in methods of production, there were also some important changes in labor management and in the effects of religious conversion on gender and family life.

The fate of cities varied greatly, with periods of significant decline in Europe and growth in other areas.

Our Topic:

Medieval Europe and Japan

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

 

Essential Question(s):

How was Medieval Europe similar to Japan?

Material to Master:

-As in the previous period, there were many forms of labor organization like peasant agriculture and serfdom

-In some places, new forms of governance emerged, including decentralized government (feudalism) in Europe and Japan

-Multiple factors contributed to the decline of urban areas in this period including: invasions, disease, decline in agricultural production, and climate change

Documents to be utilized:

-Comparative essay of Japanese and English Feudalism from Hyperhistory.net which espouses a A Christian worldview of history

-Plague in Art: Black Death 14th Century & Mass Burial, Plague, Belgium 1349

-Map of spread of the plague

In Class:

Discussion of Reading, in partners students complete a venn diagram comparing Europe to Japan,

Video on plague

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

254-257

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayfortysix_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

- 

Turn in next class:

-  Essay: Compare the economic and cultural impact of the trans-Saharan and Indian Ocean trade routes from the first century CE to sixteenth century CE.  Write this essay in 40 minutes from memory -- due in class Ruther's tomorrow.

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

41

Dates:

600-1450

K.C. #:

3.2.I.A, 3.3.III.C

Key Concept:

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new states emerged.

Despite significant continuities in social structure and in methods of production, there were also some important changes in labor management and in the effects of religious conversion on gender and family life.

Our Topic:

Byzantine Empire, Orthodox Christianity

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

254-257

Essential Question(s):

What were the changes and continuities as Rome transitioned into the Byzantine Empire?

Material to Master:

-Following the collapse of empires, most reconstituted government including the Byzantine Empire combined traditional sources of power and legitimacy with innovations better suited to the current circumstances.

 

Documents to be utilized:

-Introduction to Justinian's Law Code

In Class:

Lecture, on split of Christianity

Students read Corpus Iuris Civilis, and identify more examples to support the Material to Master

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

Read this

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

-Byzantine Peasants

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

42

Dates:

600-1450

K.C. #:

3.2.I.A, 3.3.III.C

Key Concept:

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new states emerged.

Despite significant continuities in social structure and in methods of production, there were also some important changes in labor management and in the effects of religious conversion on gender and family life.

Our Topic:

Byzantine Empire, Orthodox Christianity

Required

Pre-Reading:

Article

Read this

Essential Question(s):

What were the changes and continuities as Rome transitioned into the Byzantine Empire?

Material to Master:

-Following the collapse of empires, most reconstituted government including the Byzantine Empire combined traditional sources of power and legitimacy with innovations better suited to the current circumstances.

-Free peasants resisted attempts to raise dues and taxes by staging revolts. 

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

Complete assignment from yesterday

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

274-277, optional video (I don't totally agree with some of the conclusions on the impact and motivations of the Crusades made in this video)

&:

 Read and print to bring to class

Flashcards:

-The Crusades

-Crusader States

Turn in next class:

- Prepare for a Socratic seminar

-Guiding Questions

- How does the author believe the Crusades are typically presented?  As a good thing or bad thing?

-Why does he believe this?

-How is the teaching of history shaped by current events?

-What might the Crusades be presented in the future?

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

43

Dates:

1095-1204

K.C. #:

3.2.II

Key Concept:

Interregional contacts and conflicts between states and empires encouraged significant technological and cultural transfer.

Our Topic:

The Crusades

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

274-277

Essential Question(s):

How did the Europeans befit from the Crusades?

Material to Master:

-European contact with the Muslim World during the crusades fostered technological and cultural transfer.

Documents to be utilized:

- Rethinking the Crusades by William Urban,

In Class:

Socratic seminar

-Guiding Questions

- How does the author believe the Crusades are typically presented?  As a good thing or bad thing?

-Why does he believe this?

-How is the teaching of history shaped by current events?

-What might the Crusades be presented in the future?

 

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

 

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

- 

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

44

Dates:

 

K.C. #:

 

AP Theme:

Theme 2: Development and Interactions of Cultures

Our Topic:

The Crusades' Impact

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

 

Essential Question(s):

What do other historians think about the importance of the Crusades?

Skill to Master:

-Historical Interpretation and Synthesis, critique diverse historical interpretations

Documents to be utilized:

-Old World Encounters by Jerry Bentley

In Class:

Universal Religions Lesson

Students will assess the arguments on the consequences of the Cross Cultural Encounters brought about by the Crusades by Jerry Bentley in Old World Encounters: Cross-Cultural Contacts and Exchanges in Pre-Modern Times (Oxford 1993)

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

273-274, 404-407, 433-434

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

-Genoa

-City-State

-Italian Trading States

-Mediterranean Trade

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

45

Dates:

 

K.C. #:

3.1.I.A,D  3.2.II.B

Key Concept:

Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices

led to an increased volume of trade, and expanded the geographical

range of existing and newly active trade networks.

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new

state forms emerged.

Our Topic:

Genoa

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

273-274, 404-407, 433-434

Essential Question(s):

 

Material to Master:

-In some places, new forms of governance emerged, including city-states in Italy.

-Existing trade routes flourished and promoted the growth of powerful new trading cities like in The Mediterranean Sea

-Commercial growth was also facilitated by state practices, trading organizations, and state-sponsored commercial infrastructures like in Genoa.

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

 Use the web to find evidence to support each Material to Master above

View CNN Millennium Movie Clip

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

284-285, optional video

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

-Sui Dynasty

-Grand Canal

Turn in next class:

- Prepare for Essay:

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

46

Dates:

581-618

K.C. #:

3.1.I.D, 3.2.I.A

Key Concept:

Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices

led to an increased volume of trade, and expanded the geographical

range of existing and newly active trade networks.

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new

state forms emerged.

Our Topic:

Sui China

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

284-285

Essential Question(s):

 

Material to Master:

-Commercial growth was also facilitated by state practices, trading organizations, and state-sponsored commercial infrastructures like the Grand Canal in China.

-Following the collapse of empires, most reconstituted governments, including the Byzantine Empire and the Chinese dynasties - Sui, Tang, and Song - combined traditional sources of power and legitimacy with innovations better suited to the current circumstances.

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

 Optional Comparative essay: Compare the systems of political administration and its impact on society in Europe and China in the period 600 to 1450.

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

285-291

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayfiftytwo_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Tang Dynasty (include the role of Confucianism and Buddhism in the government over time)

-Tang Cross-cultural exchange

-Tang Economy

-Chang'an

Turn in next class:

·       

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

47

Dates:

618-907

K.C. #:

3.1.I.D, 3.2.I.A, 3.3.I.C

Key Concept:

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new

state forms emerged.

Interregional contacts and conflicts between states and empires

encouraged significant technological and cultural transfers.

Innovations stimulated agricultural and industrial production in

many regions.

Our Topic:

Tang China

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

285-291

Essential Question(s):

 Why was Tang China like the drink?

Material to Master:

-Following the collapse of empires, most reconstituted governments, including the Tang - combined traditional sources of power and legitimacy, like patriarchy with innovations like the political use of Buddhism to better suited to the current circumstances.

-There was technological and cultural transfers Between Tang China and the Abbasids

-Chinese, Persian, and Indian artisans and merchants expanded their production of textiles and porcelains for export; industrial production of iron and steel expanded in China.

Documents to be utilized:

-Tang Law Code, in Bulliet

-Seventeen Governing Principles: "Prince Shotoku's Constitution" in Bulliet

In Class:

 

 

Complete Tang Drink graphic organizer and visual analysis

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

291-298

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayfiftyfour_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Song Dynasty

-Paper Money in China

-Song Technology

-Song Industry

-Foot Binding

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

48

Dates:

 

K.C. #:

3.1.II.D, 3.2.I.A, 3.2.II, 3.3.I.C

Key Concept:

Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices

led to an increased volume of trade, and expanded the geographical

range of existing and newly active trade networks.

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new

state forms emerged.

Innovations stimulated agricultural and industrial production in

many regions.

Our Topic:

Song China

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

291-298

Essential Question(s):

 How did Song technology change the world?

Material to Master:

-Commercial growth was also facilitated by state practices, trading organizations, and state-sponsored commercial infrastructures like the paper money in China.

-Following the collapse of empires, most reconstituted governments, including the Byzantine Empire and the Chinese dynasties - Sui, Tang, and Song - combined traditional sources of power and legitimacy with innovations better suited to the current circumstances.

-Chinese, Persian, and Indian artisans and merchants expanded their production of textiles and porcelains for export; industrial production of iron and steel expanded in China.

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

 

Lecture with images of Song technology

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

341-347 optional video

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayfiftynine_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-The Rise of the Mongols

-Genghis Khan

-Mongol Society

-Mongol Government

-Mongol Warfare

Turn in next class:

·    

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

49

Dates:

1200-1260

K.C. #:

3.1.II.A, 3.2.I.B

Key Concept:

The movement of peoples caused environmental and linguistic

effects.

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new

state forms emerged.

Our Topic:

Mongols

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

341-347

Essential Question(s):

 Why are the Mongols considered the most important people in history?

Material to Master:

-The expansion and intensification of long-distance trade routes often depended on environmental knowledge and technological adaptations to it like The way Central Asian pastoral groups used horses to travel in the steppes

-In some places, new forms of governance emerged, including those developed in various Mongol Khanates

Documents to be utilized:

-William of Rubruck's account of Mongols in Bulliet

-Ata-Malik Juvaini's The History of the World-Conqueror, and Life in Bulliet

-Hu Szu-hui's Proper and Essential Things for the Emperor's Food and Drink in Bulliet

In Class:

 

 

Nystrom Map: Basic History of the Mongols, create a timeline for notebook.

 

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

348-352 optional video

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaysixty_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Il-khan

-Bubonic Plague

-Mongols & Trade

-Golden Horde

-Intellectual Development of the Il-khan

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

50

Dates:

1200-1500

K.C. #:

3.1.II.A, 3.2.I.B

Key Concept:

The movement of peoples caused environmental and linguistic

effects.

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new

state forms emerged.

Our Topic:

Mongols

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

348-352

Essential Question(s):

 

Material to Master:

-The expansion and intensification of long-distance trade routes often depended on environmental knowledge and technological adaptations to it like The way Central Asian pastoral groups used horses to travel in the steppes

-In some places, new forms of governance emerged, including those developed in various Mongol Khanates

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

 

Complete Picture Document Jigsaw

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

353-358

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaysixtyone_files/frame.htm

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaysixtytwo_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Continue Golden Horde from yesterday

-Mongol Yoke

-Political Consequences of Golden Horde

-Yuan China Society

-Yuan Government

-Yuan Economy

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

51

Dates:

1200-1500

K.C. #:

3.1.III.E, 3.2.II

Key Concept:

Cross-cultural exchanges were fostered by the intensification of

existing, or the creation of new, networks of trade and communication.

Interregional contacts and conflicts between states and empires

encouraged significant technological and cultural transfers.

Our Topic:

Mongols, impact

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

353-358

Essential Question(s):

 

Material to Master:

-Increased cross-cultural interactions also resulted in the diffusion of scientific and technological traditions like The spread of printing and gunpowder technologies from East Asia into the Islamic empires and Western Europe.

-Interregional contacts and conflicts between states and empires encouraged significant technological and cultural transfers across the Mongol empires

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

 

Jig Saw presentations

Homework:

Read  this  and this:

 

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

 

Turn in next class:

- Prepare for tomorrows debate by reading this  and this

Positions:

- The Mongols fostered innovation and development in the areas the controlled

-The Mongols stifled growth, which slowed development of the areas that they controlled

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

52

Dates:

 

K.C. #:

3.1.II.E, 3.2.II

Key Concept:

Cross-cultural exchanges were fostered by the intensification of

existing, or the creation of new, networks of trade and communication.

Interregional contacts and conflicts between states and empires

encouraged significant technological and cultural transfers.

Our Topic:

Mongol Impact

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

359-368

Essential Question(s):

 Where the Mongols good for the people they conquered?

Material to Master:

-Increased cross-cultural interactions also resulted in the diffusion of scientific and technological traditions like The spread of printing and gunpowder technologies from East Asia into the Islamic empires and Western Europe.

-Interregional contacts and conflicts between states and empires encouraged significant technological and cultural transfers across the Mongol empires

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

 Students evaluate the Mongol Yoke Thesis in a Class Room Debate

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

359-368

&/or:

 http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondaysixtythree_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Ming China

-Zheng He

-Changes from Mongols to Ming

-Gunpowder (everything books says about it)

-Moveable Type

-Ming Agriculture

-Mongol impact on Korea and Japan

-Zen Buddhism

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

53

Dates:

1200-1500

K.C. #:

3.3.I.A&B, 3.3.II.A&B

Key Concept:

Innovations stimulated agricultural and industrial production in

many regions.

The fate of cities varied greatly, with periods of significant

decline, and with periods of increased urbanization buoyed by rising

productivity and expanding trade networks.

Interregional contacts and conflicts between states and empires

encouraged significant technological and cultural transfers.

Our Topic:

Decline of the Mongols and Ming China

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

399-412

Essential Question(s):

 How did Europe rise out of the Dark Age?

Material to Master:

-Increased cross-cultural interactions also resulted in the diffusion of scientific and technological traditions like The spread of printing and gunpowder technologies from East Asia into the Islamic empires and Western Europe.

-Interregional contacts and conflicts between states and empires encouraged significant technological and cultural transfers across the Mongol empires

-Official Chinese maritime activity expanded into the Indian Ocean region with the naval voyages led by Ming Admiral Zheng He, which enhanced Chinese prestige.

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

Wrap up Mongols

-regional comparisons

-the silk road

 

Ming China

-cutting off Central Asia and turning to the sea

(video clip)

-

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

399-412; 454-455

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayseventytwo_files/frame.htm

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayseventyone_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Revival of Medieval Western Europe

-Bubonic Plague (continue of other card)

-Horse Collar

-Guilds

-Urban Revival

-Climate in the 12th & 13th

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

54

Dates:

1200-1500

K.C. #:

3.3.I.A&B, 3.3.II.A&B

Key Concept:

Innovations stimulated agricultural and industrial production in

many regions.

The fate of cities varied greatly, with periods of significant

decline, and with periods of increased urbanization buoyed by rising

productivity and expanding trade networks.

Our Topic:

Europe's rise out of the "Dark Age"

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

 454-455

Essential Question(s):

 How did Europe catch up?

Material to Master:

-Agricultural production increased significantly due to technological innovations like the horse collar.

-In response to increasing demand in Afro-Eurasia for foreign luxury goods, crops were transported from their indigenous homelands to equivalent climates in other regions.

-Multiple factors contributed to urban revival including The end of invasions, The availability of safe and reliable transport, The rise of commerce and the warmer temperatures between 800, and 1300, Increased agricultural productivity and subsequent rising population, Greater availability of labor also contributed to urban growth including guilds

-Free peasants resisted attempts to raise dues and taxes by staging revolts. 

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

 Complete concept web of factors leading to Europe's recovery

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

 

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

- 

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

55

Dates:

 

K.C. #:

DBQ

AP Theme:

 

Essay Question:

 

Skill to Master:

·       DBQ

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

Day in the Archives Activity, working in groups students use original documents to write the history of a real person

 

DBQ Rubric  & Format

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

 

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

- 

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

56

Dates:

 

K.C. #:

DBQ

AP Theme:

 

Essay Question:

 

Skills to Master:

-DBQ

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

 Continue day 55

 

DBQ Rubric  & Format

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

308-315

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayfiftysix_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Mayan Government

-Mayan Trade

-Mayan Society

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

57

Dates:

200-900

K.C. #:

3.2.1.D, 3.1.I.B

Key Concept:

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new

state forms emerged.

Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices

led to an increased volume of trade, and expanded the geographical

range of existing and newly active trade networks.

Our Topic:

Maya & Impact of Humans on the Environment

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

308-315

Essential Question(s):

ENV-4 Explain how environmental factors influenced human migrations and settlements.

ENV-5 Explain how human migrations affected the environment.

ENV-6 Explain how people used technology to overcome geographic barriers to migration over time.

Material to Master:

· In the Americas, as in Afro-Eurasia, state systems expanded in scope and reach: Networks of city-states flourished in the Maya region

· New trade routes centering on Mesoamerica and the Andes developed.

·The expansion and intensification of long-distance trade routes often depended on environmental knowledge and technological adaptations to it.

· Some migrations had a significant environmental impact, including:

· The maritime migrations of the Polynesian peoples who cultivated transplanted foods and domesticated animals as they moved to new islands

· There was continued diffusion of crops and pathogens, including epidemic diseases like the bubonic plague, along the trade routes throughout the Eastern Hemisphere.

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

AP Insight: Pre-Assessment: Student Progress Sheet

AP Insight: Challenge Area 2: Causation: Humans and the Environment, Building Block B, Performance Task – Causes & Effects of Migrations and Settlements

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

315-319

&/or:

http://www.whshumanitiescohort.org/weblessondayfiftyseven_files/frame.htm

Flashcards:

-Mexica

-Mexica Government

-Mexica Society

-Mexica Economy

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

58

Dates:

900-1500

K.C. #:

3.2.1.D, 3.1.I.B

Key Concept:

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new

state forms emerged.

Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices

led to an increased volume of trade, and expanded the geographical

range of existing and newly active trade networks.

Our Topic:

Mexica (AKA Aztecs)

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet:

315-319

Essential Question(s):

 How should the Aztecs be remembered?

Material to Master:

-In the Americas, as in Afro-Eurasia, state systems expanded in scope and reach: Networks of city-states flourished in the Maya region and, at the end of this period, imperial systems were created by the Mexica ("Aztecs") and Inca.

-New trade routes centering on Mesoamerica and the Andes developed.

Documents to be utilized:

- 

In Class:

AP Insight: Challenge Area 2 Causation: Human's and the Environment, Building Block A Quiz

Discuss results and next steps

 

Students guided through the steps in writing a DBQ with Inca / Aztec Comparison DBQ

 

DBQ Rubric  & Format

Homework:

Read Bulliet pages:

323-331

&/or:

 

Flashcards:

-Inca Empire

-Ayllu

-Mita

-Trade in the Andes

Turn in next class:

- 

NOTE: disregard all assignment instructions in web lessons

Day:

59

Dates:

 

K.C. #:

3.2.1.D, 3.1.I.B

Key Concept:

Empires collapsed and were reconstituted; in some regions new

state forms emerged.

Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices

led to an increased volume of trade, and expanded the geographical

range of existing and newly active trade networks.

Our Topic:

Inca

Required

Pre-Reading:

Bulliet: